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Publications

To order print copies of a publication on a reproductive rights topic, use the Reproductive Rights Project publication order form, available for download in PDF format. To order any other publication in print form, call 212.607.3300. Most publications are also available for download in PDF form.
Know Your Rights: Frequently Asked Questions about New York's Marriage Equality Act (Updated: 2014)

Now that same-sex couples have the freedom to marry in New York and their marriages will be recognized by the federal government, the NYCLU has compiled a guide to answer some frequently asked questions about the Marriage Equality Act in 2011 and the impact of the 2013 Supreme Court decision striking down the Defense of Marriage Act. Please note: This brief overview is not intended to provide individualized legal advice.

Fact Sheet: United States v. Windsor (2013)

On March 27, 2013, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments in Windsor v. United States regarding the constitutionality of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) -- a federal statute that defines marriage for all federal purposes as a legal union between one man and one woman as husband and wife.

Fact Sheet: Why GENDA Matters (2012)

For some New Yorkers, the most simple and fundamental parts of their identity – their clothing, their speech, even their names – expose them to hostility and exclusion. People who do not conform to gender-based stereotypes, or whose gender presentation or identity differs from the one usually associated with their anatomical sex, often experience persistent discrimination and harassment. They face challenges earning a living, finding housing, and enjoying the simple pleasures and necessities of life.

Report: Advancing Transgender Civil Rights in New York: The Need for GENDA (2012)

For some New Yorkers, the simplest and most fundamental parts of their identity – their clothing, their speech, even their names – expose them to hostility and exclusion. People who do not conform to genderbased stereotypes, or whose gender presentation or identity differs from the one usually associated with their anatomical sex, often experience persistent discrimination and harassment. They face challenges earning a living, finding housing and enjoying the simple pleasures and

Palm Card: Know Your Rights: LGBTQ Rights in Schools (2011)

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Questioning (LGBTQ) youth often face harassment and discrimination simply for being who they are. Just the thought of entering the school doors can be a nightmare for many students. But the law requires school administrators and teachers to:

  • Protect LGBTQ students from bullying and harassment.
  • Treat LGBTQ students fairly and equally.
  • Respect LGBTQ students’ free speech and free expression rights.
  • Respect LGBTQ students’ privacy rights.

Fact Sheet: Why Marriage Fairness Matters (2011)

Marriage is the ultimate expression of love and commitment. Married couples make a public vow of love and responsibility to each other. Like everyone else, gay and lesbian New Yorkers want to express their love and protect their families through marriage. Two adults who make this private, personal choice should not be denied the opportunity to legally marry just because they are gay or lesbian.

Report: Bullying in New York City Schools: Educators Speak Out (2011)

We are deeply disturbed about the horrific increase in violent bigotry in our city, including in our schools. In October 2010 alone, two Bronx teens and one adult were beaten and tortured by a group of attackers because they were gay, and a Staten Island freshman stopped going to school because of the consistent abuse and bullying he faced by a group of classmates because he was Muslim.

Report: Dignity Now: The Campaign to Stop Bullying and Bias-Based Harassment in New York City Schools (2009)

Dignity Now: The Campaign to Stop Bullying and Bias-Harassment in New York City Schools, a white paper by the New York Civil Liberties Union and the New York City Bar Association’s Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Rights Committee, uses legal analysis and students’ first-hand accounts to conclude that though Mayor Bloomberg and the DOE have made strides toward ending the problem of bullying and biased-based harassment in the schools, more effort is necessary.

Fact Sheet: Dignity for All Students (2010)

The Dignity in All Schools Act (DASA) is a law that, if implemented, would prohibit harrassment, making schools more accountable and allowing students to reach their fullest potential.

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