Holding Presidential Debate on Private Property Undermined Free Expression: NYCLU

October 7, 2016 — Holding a major public event, like a presidential debate, on private property far removed from the public can raise free speech problems, the New York Civil Liberties Union’s Nassau County Chapter reports after it dispatched legal observers to Hofstra University for the first debate between Hilary Clinton and Donald Trump. Given the intense public interest in this election and in the debates themselves, the NYCLU is disappointed that the Commission on Presidential Debates didn’t make more of an effort to accommodate protest activity within a reasonable distance from the site of the debate. Dissent is an integral part of every election campaign. The second presidential debate on Sunday night will also take place at a private university.

“Considering this was the most watched presidential debate in history, it is unfortunate that there was not a greater effort made to allow for peaceful protest within reasonable proximity to the debate,” said Susan Gottehrer, Director of the NYCLU’s Nassau County Chapter. “The Commission should ensure that events so significant to the public are situated in areas that also accommodate robust free expression.

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Victory: Law Targeting Latino Day Laborers Struck Down in Long Island

September 3, 2015 — A federal district court today affirmed the right of Latino day laborers in Oyster Bay, Long Island to seek work in public spaces, following a lawsuit by the New York Civil Liberties Union, the American Civil Liberties Union and LatinoJustice PRLDEF. The decision permanently struck down a town ordinance that prohibited people from soliciting work for violating the First Amendment.

“Our constitution protects the rights of American newcomers seeking the opportunity to work hard for a better quality of life,” said Corey Stoughton, NYCLU Supervising Senior Staff Attorney. “We should be celebrating the entrepreneurial spirit of day laborers not stigmatizing them.”

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Victory: Landmark State Policy Promises Transgender Students an Equal Education

July 20, 2015 — The New York State Education Department today released official guidance for school districts across the state, a major step toward ensuring that transgender and gender nonconforming youth can access their right to an education. The announcement is the result of years of advocacy by transgender advocates and supporters across the state, most recently a New York Civil Liberties Union report that documented the pervasive harassment faced by transgender students and prompted Governor Cuomo to demand the Education Department take immediate action to address the concerns.

“We applaud the State Education Department for providing guidance so every school in the state knows how to follow the law and protect the rights of transgender and gender nonconforming youth,” said NYCLU Executive Director Donna Lieberman. “Too many New York youth have faced relentless harassment and discrimination in the schools that should have nurtured them just for being who they are. We look forward to working with the state to ensure that transgender students have the same rights to an education that all kids are entitled to in New York.”

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Report Exposes Illegal Treatment of Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Students in New York Public Schools

June 24, 2015 — The New York Civil Liberties Union today released a report revealing the serious and pervasive discrimination and harassment faced by transgender and gender nonconforming youth in New York public schools across the state. Despite New York’s reputation as a progressive leader, the state is failing to protect the right to an education of one of its most vulnerable student populations.

“In public schools across New York, transgender and gender nonconforming children as young as five face relentless harassment, threats and even violence for trying to access their right to an education,” said NYCLU Executive Director Donna Lieberman. “And instead of supporting kids, too many schools are magnifying the problem by imposing discriminatory and even illegal policies.”

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State Legislative Leaders Fail to Agree to Any Major Criminal Justice Reforms

June 24, 2015 — Despite countless protests, the deaths of Eric Garner, Kalief Browder and too many others, and growing distrust between communities and law enforcement agencies, New York State’s legislative leaders announced they have failed to agree to any major criminal justice reforms, inaction denounced by the New York Civil Liberties Union.

“Our leaders have turned their backs on the thousands of New Yorkers who took to the streets over the last year to demand justice and proof that black lives matter,” said NYCLU Executive Director Donna Lieberman. “By going on summer vacation without taking any meaningful steps toward criminal justice reform, they have failed New Yorkers and they have failed to promote basic justice and fairness.”

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State Education Department Must Take Steps to Ensure Immigrant Children Can Attend School

February 17, 2015 — In response to reports that the Hempstead Union Free School District and other Long Island school districts continue to block immigrant children from their right to an education, a coalition of advocacy organizations, faith-based groups, and providers of legal and social services working in Nassau and Suffolk counties has sent a letter to the New York State Education Department urging reforms. The New York Civil Liberties Union helped draft the letter.

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Judge Orders Nassau County to Appoint Jail Oversight Board

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April 4, 2013 — A State Supreme Court justice has ordered Nassau County to comply with a 23-year-old unfulfilled charter mandate to establish an independent board charged with overseeing and reforming conditions at the Nassau County Correctional Center, where county officials have for years failed to meet their obligation to provide prisoners adequate medical and mental health care.

The ruling was issued late Wednesday in Marone v. Nassau County, a New York Civil Liberties Union lawsuit seeking to compel the county to fulfill its duty to appoint the Board of Visitors, an independent oversight committee that has never fully operated since being established in 1990. The County Charter authorizes the seven-member committee to respond to inmate grievances and advise the sheriff on programs that would improve the care and treatment of people housed at the jail.

"More than 20 years after Nassau County voters overwhelmingly approved this charter amendment, there will finally be much-needed oversight at the jail," said Jason E. Starr, director of the NYCLU's Nassau County Chapter. "Now it is up to County Executive Edward Mangano to follow the letter and the spirit of the charter mandate by appointing seven people to the Board of Visitors who possess the independence and expertise to effectively oversee the jail and who reflect our community’s diversity."

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NYCLU Sues Nassau County to Establish Jail Oversight Board

In November, the NYCLU and our allies held a rally to demand better conditions in the Nassau County jail.

March 21, 2012 – Following the recent suicide of an Iraq war veteran housed at the Nassau County Correctional Center – the fifth inmate suicide in less than two years – the New York Civil Liberties Union today filed a lawsuit to compel county officials to comply with a 22-year-old unfulfilled charter mandate to establish an independent board charged with overseeing and reforming conditions at the jail.

“Tragically, a stay at the Nassau County Jail can become a death sentence for the 11,000 people a year who are housed there awaiting trial or serving time for minor offenses,” said Samantha Fredrickson, director of the NYCLU’s Nassau County Chapter. “Since Nassau County Executive Edward Mangano has turned a blind eye to this disturbing reality, we have no choice but to ask the court to compel the county to take this initial step toward finally treating people housed at the jail with basic human dignity.”

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Chapter Presses Nassau County to Improve Jail Oversight

The Nassau County Chapter and our coalition partners rallied in front of the Nassau County Legislative Building on Monday to urge the County to restore a legally required oversight committee at the county jail.

Five inmates have died at the Nassau Jail since Jan, 2010 and the number of inmates complaining about inadequate medical and mental health care has skyrocketed. A charter-mandated oversight committee, called the Board of Visitors, has never formally operated, though it is badly needed.

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Following the DREAM: Practical Suggestions for Working with Immigrant Students

On October 27 more than 30 educators from across Long Island packed the Christ Church of Oyster Bay to discuss immigrants’ rights in the classroom.

Teachers, administrators and social workers shared their concerns and suggestions about working with immigrant students. The educators received guidance on how to teach students about immigrants’ rights and how to encourage tolerance toward immigrants.

Liz Marcuci and Rachel Baskin from the American Immigration Lawyers Association gave a rundown on basic immigration law and the difficulty of immigrating to the United States. Nassau Chapter Director Samantha Fredrickson addressed the Dignity Act, a new anti-bullying law, and the constitutional rights of immigrants. Maria Contreras, an immigrants’ rights advocate, guided teachers in how to work with immigrant students during the transition from high school to college.

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Advocates Urge Nassau Legislature to Restore Jail Oversight Committee

October 17, 2011 -- A coalition of inmate advocates and civil rights groups today urged the Nassau County Legislature to restore a long-dormant oversight committee to address inadequate medical and mental health services at the Nassau County Correctional Center. The committee, the Board of Visitors, is mandated by the County Charter, but apparently it has never fully operated since being established in 1990. The charter authorizes the seven-member committee to respond to inmate grievances and advise the sheriff on programs that would improve the care and treatment of people housed at the jail.

“The county is not meeting its constitutional obligation to ensure safe and humane conditions at the jail,” said Samantha Fredrickson, director of the New York Civil Liberties Union’s Nassau County Chapter. “The Board of Visitors would provide badly needed oversight and help ensure that people housed at the jail are receiving the health care they need.”

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